Frankincense and Myrrh /p>

Why should Dzhokhar Tsarnaev not be charged with WMD - Weapons of Mass Destruction?

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the remaining living Boston Bomber suspect, is apparently being charged with using WMD.

WMD - weapon of mass destruction, is a term that generally means nuclear, chemical or biological weapons. For example, when the U.S. Government gave the aboriginal Americans pox infected blankets, that was a biological weapon and WMD.

But is a gunpowder bomb in a pressure cooker?

Even U.S. Code says: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/2332a (c)

Definitions.— For purposes of this section—

...

(2) the term “weapon of mass destruction” means—

(A) any destructive device as defined in section 921 of this title;

(B) any weapon that is designed or intended to cause death or serious bodily injury through the release, dissemination, or impact of toxic or poisonous chemicals, or their precursors;

(C) any weapon involving a biological agent, toxin, or vector (as those terms are defined in section 178 of this title); or

(D) any weapon that is designed to release radiation or radioactivity at a level dangerous to human life; and So nuclear, chemical or biological.

So why is this concerning, charging Tsarnaev with using WMD?

Because in recent years, the anti-gun lobby has worked to confuse guns as WMD, as a propaganda strategy, and they are now using the fact that gunpowder was allegedly used in the Boston Bombing, to make the pressure cooker bombs, as a reason to ban or regulate civilian access to gunpowder, as part of a greater agenda to ban all civilian access to firearms.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev can, and should be charged with many things, including several first degree murders ( though I don't think the People's Republic of Massachusetts has the death penalty ) but he should not be charged with any WMD crimes, as that could harm the rights of the rest of us, which I suspect is the intention of the left, in this.

Please make your opinion known to the prosecutors in this case, as well as to your government officials, that the term "WMD" should not be debased in this matter, as part of a left wing strategy to further erode our human rights to keep and bear arms!

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Tags: arms, guns, tsarnaev, wmd

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Comment by Gary Kuess on July 13, 2013 at 10:54am

Because he is on Obama's team!

Comment by Cynthia Catsman on July 12, 2013 at 8:39pm

Good point - give them 10 years and the SOB will probably have a Boston parade in his honor on Hasan Day.

Comment by Roni Freels on July 12, 2013 at 8:33pm

Most \likely, future plans for the Boston Bomber will be handled just as Hasan the Ft. Hood murderer.  He is sitting in jail, wearing the uniform of who he claims to be infidels and collecting money from the Army, per Eric Holder.  Never has a court date been set and holder calls it a workplace incident.  Perhaps the Boston Bomber will receive the same cushey treatment and be charged only for breaking into a boat without owners permission.

Comment by Cynthia Catsman on July 12, 2013 at 8:25pm

Believe it's called doublespeak and it's the language of disinformation and political correctness. Problem is that it has little to do with either truth or reality.

Comment by Carolyn Hamilton on July 12, 2013 at 3:10pm
Comment by Carolyn Hamilton on July 12, 2013 at 3:03pm

I read the day of his hearing, he was charged with WMD... Need to check this out, will get back to you.

Comment by Debrajoe Smith-Beatty on July 12, 2013 at 2:50pm

Thanks.

Comment by Jane Galt on July 12, 2013 at 2:44pm

They use the tactics of Fabian Socialism - to wear us down slowly over time, by attrition. It's working.

“The best way to take control over a people and control them utterly is to take a little of their freedom at a time, to erode rights by a thousand tiny and almost imperceptible reductions. In this way the people will not see those rights and freedoms being removed until past the point at which these changes cannot be reversed.” - Adolf Hitler

Comment by Frank Chance Chenoweth on July 12, 2013 at 2:14pm

Excellent point, Jane, about the end goal the left has in mind.  The left is always like that; I wish our side could do the same.

--Frank Nitty

Comment by Jack Kemp on July 12, 2013 at 2:06pm

Here's my documentation on this pox in the blankets story being false:

http://tbirdnow.mee.nu/ward_churchill_still_a_wet_blanket

February 24, 2009

Ward Churchill Still a Wet Blanket

Jack Kemp (not the politician):

Ward Churchill still a wet blanket
 
Mr. Selwyn Duke's recent fine article "Hating Whitey"  has made me recall something I recently read by a liberal writer about the true origins of a liberal racial injustice myth and the facts that debunk this argument that was spread by Ward Churchill and others. I know this has little direct bearing on today's news. But since I recently found this relatively obscure story origin and its topic is still a part of the left's ongoing national harangue on race, I thought I'd pass this documentation source from Wikipedia and the full Wikipedia article (which doesn't categorically take the left's side) along to you.
 
Ward Churchill argued that US Army troops distributed blankets laced with smallpox to tribes in the Dakotas region. This was debunked, but there is a flimsy origin for this story that predates the United States itself.

In 1763 in Ft. Pitt (Pittsburg), the British colonists had been attacked repeatedly by Indians during the French and Indian War. There is a letter written by a British officer suggesting that the colonists should give out blankets laced with smallpox to the Indians. There is no evidence this plan was ever enacted. That the Indians would accept gifts during a war from their  enemies ("Greeks bearing gifts," as it were) is highly unlikely and probably absurd. Documentation and some history appears below. This is the origin of the myth/lie/story that "European Americans give Native Americans blankets with smallpox."

http://brneurosci.org/smallpox.html
Smallpox, Indians, and Germ Warfare

The story of the British spreading smallpox as a form of germ warfare against the American Indians in the years before the Revolutionary War has received wide attention in recent years. But is it true or merely politically-inspired disinformation?

Lord Jeffery Amherst was the commanding general of British forces in North America during the final battles of the French and Indian war (1754-1763). During this war, the French allied with the Indians in an attempt to drive the British out of North America. The evidence that suggests a possible "germ warfare" tactic during this war consists entirely of postscripts attached to the ends of two letters from Colonel Henry Bouquet during Pontiac's Rebellion:

Colonel Henry Bouquet to General Amherst, dated 13 July 1763:
P.S. I will try to inocculate the the Indians by means of Blankets that may fall in their hands, taking care however not to get the disease myself. As it is pity to oppose good men against them, I wish we could make use of the Spaniard's Method, and hunt them with english dogs, supported by Rangers, and some Light Horse, who would I think effectively extirpate or remove that Vermine.

Amherst responded to Bouquet, in a letter dated 16 July 1763:
P.S. You will do well to try to Innoculate the Indians by means of Blanketts, as well as to try Every other method that can serve to Extirpate this Execrable Race. I should be very glad your Scheme for Hunting them Down by Dogs could take Effect effect, but England is at too great a Distance to think of that at present.

A third letter on 26 July 1763 from Colonel Bouquet acknowledges receipt of the approval:

``Sir, I received yesterday your Excellency's letters of 16th with their Inclosures. The signal for Indian Messengers, and all your directions will be observed.``

The original letters were microfilmed in Britain during World War II to protect them from possible damage. Assuming that these letters are authentic, it seems clear from the foregoing that Amherst was caught up in war fever, and not at all fond of Indians, and that plans were made to inoculate them with some disease. This disease is presumed to be smallpox, because one earlier letter contains the line:

Could it not be contrived to send the Small Pox among those disaffected tribes of Indians? We must on this occasion use every stratagem in our power to reduce them.

However, there is not a shred of evidence that this plan was actually carried out. Conspicuous by its absence is any letter indicating that either of them took any action on the plan. It is inconceivable that such a letter, if it existed, would not have been found, with the armies of revisionist historians undoubtedly searching for it. Since smallpox was known to be in the area at the time, any disease outbreak among the Indians would prove little. It is also not clear why Lord Amherst hated Indians so much. Although there were often conflicts between the settlers and native Indians, history shows that in most cases both sides went to great lengths to maintain peaceful relations. Thomas Jefferson, for example, had a Romantic conception of the Indians, speculating at one point that they might be one of the lost tribes of Israel. One possibility for the anger is that the British may have felt betrayed by the Indians, who sided with their mortal enemies, the despised French.

In those days, smallpox was epidemic throughout Europe and North America. Contact between the two continents spread this and other diseases through the population. Just as the European continent had been ravaged by plague after contact with Asia, the Indian population had been decimated by smallpox and other diseases unintentionally brought from Europe. Pocahontas, for example, an Indian who was idolized by the British, died tragically in Britain from pulmonary disease.

In this era of frenetic Western civilization-bashing, however, the smallpox story has taken on a life of its own, with any document containing the word "blanket" being reinterpreted to generate a sort of conspiracy theory. For example, the diary of William Trent, who was a commander of the militia of the townspeople of Pittsburgh during Pontiac's siege of the fort, contains an entry from which the following line is often quoted: "We gave them two Blankets and an Handkerchief out of the Small Pox Hospital. I hope it will have the desired effect." (May 24, 1763). Taken out of context, this sounds quite sinister. But the entire diary entry shows that this was clearly intended as a gesture of friendship:

The Turtles Heart a principal Warrior of the Delawares and Mamaltee a Chief came within a small distance of the Fort Mr. McKee went out to them and they made a Speech letting us know that all our [POSTS] as Ligonier was destroyed, that great numbers of Indians [were coming and] that out of regard to us, they had prevailed on 6 Nations [not to] attack us but give us time to go down the Country and they desired we would set of[f] immediately. The Commanding Officer thanked them, let them know that we had everything we wanted, that we could defend it against all the Indians in the Woods, that we had three large Armys marching to Chastise those Indians that had struck us, told them to take care of their Women and Children, but not to tell any other Natives, they said they would go and speak to their Chiefs and come and tell us what they said, they returned and said they would hold fast of the Chain of friendship. Out of our regard to them we gave them two Blankets and an Handkerchief out of the Small Pox Hospital. I hope it will have the desired effect. They then told us that Ligonier had been attacked, but that the Enemy were beat of

The diary entry clearly shows that the "desired effect" was to express their friendly regard for the Indians, not to kill them. Of course, with what we know today about contagious diseases, the gesture was a horribly misguided one. But only the most cynical and biased reader could interpret this paragraph as evidence of germ warfare.

Indeed, in those days, the idea that microorganisms caused disease had not even been imagined. In 1796 Jenner performed the first vaccination against smallpox, with no clue about its actual nature. The concept that diseases were caused by living organisms was unknown. In fact, the theory of spontaneous generation was widely held until Louis Pasteur's famous experiment in 1859. Robert Koch was the first to prove that a bacterium caused disease, in this case anthrax, in 1876. Viruses were not conceptualized until the late 19th century.

Given today's knowledge of smallpox as a disease, we must also ask whether it is even possible to spread smallpox with blankets. Since American scientists led the drive to eradicate smallpox in the 1970s, the average person today has little intuition for how effective a blanket would be at spreading contagion.

The Poxviridae family of viruses, which includes the variola virus that causes smallpox, are DNA-containing viruses that are among the largest and most complex of all animal viruses. The virus particles consist of an outer coat consisting of proteins crosslinked by disulfide bonds. These particles, isolated from cells, are called intracellular naked virions or IMV. Virus particles isolated from tissue culture medium are called extracellular enveloped virions (EEV), and contain an additional lipoprotein envelope. Both types of particles are infectious. EEVs would be the particles that would be shed into the environment by infected patients.

According to the U.S. Government's book Medical Aspects of Chemical and Biological Warfare, the smallpox EEV is highly stable and can retain its infectivity for long periods outside the host; however, sunlight and air greatly reduce the viability of virus particles. Smallpox is highly infectious when spread by aerosol, but infectivity from contaminated cotton bedding is infrequent (Bull. WHO 1957, 16:247-254), because the virus must enter through the nose to create infection. Thus, although it is certainly not impossible for a blanket to carry smallpox, transmission by blankets would be inefficient at best.

The Amherst letters suggest that Colonel Bouquet undoubtedly considered the possibility of infecting Indians with smallpox. In legal terms, this shows ``intent''. But continuing the analogy to a legal case, much more is needed to prove that a historical event occurred than intent. Even to indict someone for conspiracy, in which an actual crime need not be committed, a prosecutor still has to prove that some action took place in furtherance of the conspiracy. It's not too much to ask that historians, whose goal is (or should be) to determine whether an event occurred, be held to a similar standard. If the only evidence we had for World War II was a letter by some guy in Austria saying how nice it would be to start a war and kill off all the Jews, few would believe that WWII had actually occurred. Yet even without evidence, many are willing to believe this act of biological warfare took place.

It's important to maintain a skeptical attitude of the uncertainty surrounding events such as this. To this day, for example, many people still believe the politically-motivated stories, now known to be false, of J. Edgar Hoover being a transvestite, and of Nixon and Kissinger having overthrown Chilean president Salvador Allende. While we can recognize that our ancestors were often brutal, we must also guard against politically-inspired disinformation masquerading as historical fact.

WIKIPEDIA on "Smallpox blankets:"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smallpox_blankets#The_siege

Blankets with smallpox

On June 29, 1763, a week after the siege began, Bouquet was preparing to lead an expedition to relieve Fort Pitt when he received a letter from Amherst making the following proposal: "Could it not be contrived to send the smallpox among the disaffected tribes of Indians? We must on this occasion use every stratagem in our power to reduce them." [1]
Bouquet agreed, writing back to Amherst on July 13, 1763: "I will try to inoculate the bastards with some blankets that may fall into their hands, and take care not to get the disease myself." Amherst responded favorably on July 16, 1763: "You will do well to inoculate the Indians by means of blankets, as well as every other method that can serve to extirpate this execrable race."[2]

However, there is no evidence that this was actually carried out. During a parley at Fort Pitt on June 24, 1763, Captain Simeon Ecuyer gave representatives of the besieging Delawares two blankets and a handkerchief that had been exposed to smallpox. It has been suggested that they hoped to spread the disease to the native tribes, but evidence for this has been taken out of context. The diary of William Trent, who was a commander of the militia of the townspeople of Pittsburgh during Pontiac's siege of the fort, contains an entry from which the following line is often quoted: "We gave them two Blankets and an Handkerchief out of the Small Pox Hospital. I hope it will have the desired effect." (May 24, 1763). However, the entire diary entry shows that this was clearly intended as a gesture of friendship:
"The Turtles Heart a principal Warrior of the Delawares and Mamaltee a Chief came within a small distance of the Fort Mr. McKee went out to them and they made a Speech letting us know that all our [POSTS] as Ligonier was destroyed, that great numbers of Indians [were coming and] that out of regard to us, they had prevailed on 6 Nations [not to] attack us but give us time to go down the Country and they desired we would set of[f] immediately. The Commanding Officer thanked them, let them know that we had everything we wanted, that we could defend it against all the Indians in the Woods, that we had three large Armys marching to Chastise those Indians that had struck us, told them to take care of their Women and Children, but not to tell any other Natives, they said they would go and speak to their Chiefs and come and tell us what they said, they returned and said they would hold fast of the Chain of friendship. Out of our regard to them we gave them two Blankets and an Handkerchief out of the Small Pox Hospital. I hope it will have the desired effect. They then told us that Ligonier had been attacked, but that the Enemy were beat of." [3]

Indians in the area did indeed contract smallpox. However, some historians have noted that it is impossible to verify how many people (if any) contracted the disease as a result of the Fort Pitt incident; the disease was already in the area and may have reached the Indians through other vectors. Indeed, even before the blankets had been handed over, the disease may have been spread to the Indians by native warriors returning from attacks on infected white settlements. So while it is certain that some British soldiers wanted to infect Indians with smallpox, it is uncertain whether or not their attempt was successful.[4] Furthermore, it was not known how the virus was transmitted at this time - the concept of diseases being spread by living organisms was unknown until Louis Pasteur's experiments in 1859 - and blankets are a poor transmitter of the disease, which must enter through the nose to create infection. Infection from cotton bedding is rare. [5]

The idea of European settlers giving infected blankets to Indians is a part of public consciousness, and a common metaphor for a gift given with underhanded intentions.

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