Work From Home

THE DAILY BLADE: The path to a Romney-Santorum ticket

Rep. Ron Paul (TX) has lately taken to calling former Sen. Rick Santorum (PA) a “fake conservative,” but voters in AL and MS, who know a fake conservative when they see one, disagree. Santorum won primaries in both states, with former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (GA) coming in second; former MA Gov. Mitt Romney in third place; and Paul dead last.

 

Romney’s campaign brushes off Santorum’s wins, pointing to an “insurmountable” lead in delegates:  

 

“While Rick Santorum is taking a victory lap after Alabama and Mississippi, the fact remains that nothing has changed or advanced his chances of getting the Republican nomination,” Rich Beeson, the Romney campaign’s political director, wrote in a memo ... “Tuesday’s results actually increased Governor Romney’s delegate lead, while his opponents only moved closer to their date of mathematical elimination.”

 

But in an interview with former MO Sen. Jim Talent, a Romney campaign adviser, CNN anchor Soledad O’Brien used a different calculus to measure Romney’s progress:

 

[O]utspending Rick Santorum, over $2 million is what your campaign spent on TV ad spending to Rick Santorum’s just under $400,000, at some point there’s a different kind of math, maybe not delegate math, that says “That’s bad math. He won and spent under $400 million. We took a $2 million hit.”

 

While acknowledging that the “delegate math will not be altered much,” Commentary posits that “Santorum is now in a position to do some real damage to the Romney juggernaut in the upcoming weeks”:

 

If Santorum ends March by stacking up victories in Illinois, Louisiana and Missouri, then although he will still be trailing badly in the delegate count, his path to the nomination won’t look quite so much of a fantasy as it did a few weeks ago. Though Romney will still have impressive advantages, so long as the votes are still be [sic] counted state by state, momentum has a way of overwhelming math.

 

The rationale of Romney’s campaign is that ideology has nothing to do with electability – an argument he has no choice but to make because conservatives think his ideology is, as one of Santorum’s surrogates puts it, “Barack Obama Lite.” For Santorum and his supporters, ideology and electability are intertwined.

 

Math and momentum will be battling it out for the next three months, and WaPo political handicapper Chris Cillizza notes that whether Gingrich likes it or not, the race is between Romney and Santorum now, and that “[i]t’s a game of “Survivor” now:

 

April looks to be Romney's best month yet in terms of the state’s set to vote. May holds good news for Santorum. June looks to be a good Romney month. …

 

Both will have to weather bad patches in which a series of losses will force them to live off the political land for a time. Both will have streaks in which they appear to be unbeatable.

 

 

It’s not just super-PAC money keeping the race going. Erick Erickson of RedStateNews observes, “the base does not want this primary to end”:

 

The roller coaster continues. The one sure thing out of this is that, though Romney is not becoming a better candidate as the primaries continue, Rick Santorum sure is. As for Newt? He is becoming less relevant.


It is time for Newt Gingrich to exit. It is time for Santorum v. Romney and let the chips fall where they may.

 

But Gingrich “has certainly demonstrated … the will to slog on with little money, driven by – pick a word – stubbornness or commitment to carry a message even when voters are not responding,” The New York Times reports:

 

Mr. Gingrich’s campaign rejected the logic that if he stepped aside, his supporters would go to Mr. Santorum. Many conservatives for whom social issues are not paramount would most likely back Mr. Romney, said Bob Walker, a Gingrich adviser and a former House member from Pennsylvania. But voter surveys on Tuesday showed that Tea Party supporters had divided their votes between Mr. Gingrich and Mr. Santorum in Alabama and Mississippi.

 

Richard Viguerie thinks that Gingrich “can either be a kingmaker or a spoiler” and argues that if Gingrich drops out now, “the odds strongly favor Santorum to get the nomination, because the Republican Party is a conservative party.”  

 

But can anything short of being promised a cabinet position or the veep spot by Santorum induce Gingrich to drop out – and should Santorum cut such a deal to finally get his chance to run against Romney one-on-one? Commentary makes the case that Santorum should just bide his time:  

 

[I]t is possible Gingrich is about to fade out of the picture anyway. Why pay a high price for his support when it might not be worth much in the coming months? …

 

Having seen what Gingrich was like when he was Speaker of the House, could Santorum really bring himself to put such an inconsistent and often unfocused person only a heartbeat away from the presidency?

 

For his part, Gingrich – who no longer has a path to the nomination – has convinced himself that he can be a kingmaker at the Republican convention by spoiling Romney’s chances of winning the necessary 1,144 delegates to win the nomination, Politico reports:

 

By continuing to split the delegates in states that award them proportionally, Gingrich’s campaign believes it could force a contested convention.

 

“If we get to the end of this process and no one has the numbers, you go to a convention where two-out-of-three delegates want a conservative nominee,” said Randy Evans, a senior campaign adviser. “This may not get settled until July or August heading into Tampa.”

 

Perhaps, but Gingrich is deluding himself if he thinks he will be the compromise candidate everyone can settle on. As he has routinely taken on the role of the party’s elder statesman in the debates, The Stiletto can only hope that Gingrich is thinking of using whatever clout he has to bring the party together by brokering a deal that results in a Romney-Santorum ticket. Both men will have proved they have a national constituency, the combination will be ideologically and geographically balanced and the divisiveness of the campaign will be forgotten as Republicans flock to the polls with renewed enthusiasm to defeat Obama.

Views: 656

Tags: 2012, Gingrich, Obama, Paul, Romney, Santorum

Comment

You need to be a member of Tea Party Nation to add comments!

Join Tea Party Nation

Comment by Rich Knoch on March 16, 2012 at 7:34am

ABO     (Anyone But obama)

Lets really concentrate on taking back the Senate with Constitutional Conservatives and add the our majority in the House - - - Congress is where the laws, regulations, judges and appointees are decided.  While we're at it lets take back our States and Local Governments ................. also!

The Primaries and November 6th will decide America's fate for decades into the future!

Comment by Diogenes on March 15, 2012 at 9:24pm

John if you were on the front lines and the battle raging: question, would you want Morris protecting your back?

In this era the one that succeeds to the Presidency is the one that has the money to destroy his competition

and the push of the media. Even Morris would agree as his aspiration is advisor to Romney.

Comment by John Gaver on March 15, 2012 at 8:28pm

The problem with a Romney-Santorum ticket is that it couldn't win. Romney will need a strong southern conservative, to balance the ticket, not a weak socially conservative northern liberal.

I would look for someone like DeMint, to be Romney's running mate.

But all the spin about how Santorum could win, in a one-on-one against Romney is exactly that... SPIN.

Remember that Paul is in the race to the end and he'll collect another 20 to 40 delegates. But even if both Gingrich and Paul were to drop out, it would still mean that Santorum would have to win more than 70% of the remaining delegates and that's not gonna happen. Romney has a functional organization and Santorum's organization wasn't even able to get on the ticket in all of the states and voting districts. Romney has a campaign team that has given him more than 50% of the delegates up to now, while even when Santorum wins the popular vote in Mississippi he loses the delegate race in that state (14 to 13 delegates). Furthermore, Romney has more than 34% in national polls, so even if Santorum had a decent campaign organization, he would still have to pull some of Romney's support, to reach 70% of the remaining delegates. Santorum's talk is all spin.

In fact, even Dick Morris finally went on record yesterday, on O'Reilly and called the nomination for Romney, promising to buy O'Reilly dinner if he was wrong. It's over.

It's not time to focus on Congress.

Comment by Diogenes on March 15, 2012 at 3:14pm

With Romney it's $66 billion Bain capital and all the trillion dollar leeches that scalped the American people and

caused over 20 million to become unemployed. I left out the Federal Reserve, the Bushes and Clintons.

Comment by jalina susan stutte on March 15, 2012 at 1:44pm

Foxs news have become somewhat Liberal and keeps pushing Romney, telling us it's all over and Romney walks on water. Well He is a Liberal not moderate. Bush and Cheney were no better, all Rinos, trying for this one world order crap. I don't let the media or people tell me how to vote. Whether he wins or not I will still vote for Gingrich. We need his wisdom and strength now more than ever.

Comment by jalina susan stutte on March 15, 2012 at 1:39pm

Romney is a RINO PERIOD! No romney at all. I wouldnt mind a Santorum/Gingrich ticket but never Romney. Fool me once shame on you.  Fool me twice shame on me. No more Rinos, if we are to survive. 

Comment by Jim Hoff on March 15, 2012 at 12:28pm

Victoria, 

Chaney and Bush were both RINOs.  Romney is  a RINO.  Santorum leans conservative.

I have to disagree that obama is completely clueless.  He is focused and winning his goal of marxism in the US.  He is an elitist, a narcissist and accomplishing what he set out to do.  He takes his instruction and guidance from fellow marxists, not bumbling Biden.  Romney is not a whole lot different.  He tried in Massachusetts to simply manage a liberal growing government.  While I don't believe he is a marxist I believe he thinks he can manage a liberal growing federal government.  He will try to manage what obama has started and simply keep us sliding don the slippery slope.  He doesn't listen to conservatives  now, why would you think he will listen to Santorum once he is president.  I

Comment by Victoria Knox on March 15, 2012 at 12:12pm

American Infidel: Romney has already said he will *not* offer the veep spot to Santorum. However, he will be singing a different tune at the convention when he will be achingly close to his goal but it will remain just out of his reach. I don't know if Gingrich has a trick up his sleeve that only he is privvy to or whether his ego isn't letting him walk away now -- I guess we will just have to wait and find out. But one way or the other, Santorum will be on the ticket -- maybe even in the top spot (though I dare not hope, because Romney's money has strangled the campaigns of every other challenger and unless voters decide on their own to coelesce behind Santorum I just don't see how he can match Romney's money or organization).

Comment by Victoria Knox on March 15, 2012 at 12:07pm

Jin Hoff: Dick Cheney was a very powerful vice president. In Bush's second term, he was all set to go wobbly -- as presidents in their second terms are wont to do, since they suddenly start caring about their "legacy" and what leftist historians will write about them -- but Cheney held his feet to the fire on national security, Gitmo, etc. Also, seeing how completely clueless Obama is, it is fair to assume that even though he is gaff-prone Biden is also schooling him in those areas he gained expertise on while he was a Senator. Santorum can exert a right-ward pull on Romney, whose inclination will be to tack left as soon as he is sworn in.

Comment by Victoria Knox on March 15, 2012 at 12:04pm

Robert Ruban: If you want news, log onto FOX.com or CNN.com. Most blogs are news-based, but have a point of view. I have always been a Santorum supporter, but any member of TPN who reads my stuff regularly -- especially my write-ups of the debates -- knows that I have been fair to all the candidates.

At this point, I think Santorum cannot overcome Romney's money and organization advantage -- he isn't even on the ballot in all the districts of all the states he is running in -- and Gingrich has not demonstrated he has a constituency outside his home state and just one other state. The only two candidates who have won in more than one region are Romney and Santorum, and since Romney is a RINO and Santorum is deemed by voters in the Deep South to be sufficiently conservative putting the two front-runners on the ticket will heal the deep divisions this bruising nomination fight has caused. We must be united when we go into the general election and 2/3 of the voters have said they cannot unite behind Romney. But 2/3 can unite behind Romney-Santorum since 2/3 of the voters already voted for one or the other in the primaries. Anyway, that's my reasoning.

Tea Party Nation is a social network

Whole Body Research

Young Living Essential Oils

 






© 2014   Created by Judson Phillips.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service